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Known & Reputed Family History

Person Page 266

Private

F, #6626, b. 2003

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: 2003

Harold Francis Dwiar

M, #6627, b. 8 August 1919, d. 3 August 2016

Parents

Family: Betty Edna Norman (b. 15 January 1925, d. 11 April 2013)

Biography

  • Birth: 8 August 1919; 53 Bell Street, Townsville, Queensland, AustraliaG
  • Marriage: 23 June 1945; Betty Edna Norman; Adelaide, South Australia, AustraliaG
  • Occupation: About 1949; boilermaker
  • Death: 3 August 2016; Adelaide, South Australia, AustraliaG; Harold Francis Dwiar
    Dad, Pa, Great Pa
    Dad was born at 53 Bell Street Townsville on the 8th of August 1919, son of Thomas Neil Dwiar and Clara Elizabeth Weinheimer.
    Dad had a sister Esther and a brother Edward also later a half-brother Roger and at some stage early in Dad’s life the family moved to Adelaide, Thomas’s family lived there.
    Dad was always ready to tell people that he lived in Chicago, renamed Kilburn in 1930 owing to confusion with Chicago USA. As a boy Dad roamed far and wide in the area as young boys were able to do at that time, and would often tell the tale of leaving one home in the morning and returning to another at night, apparently a common occurrence during the depression.
    Dad, known as Jerry to his mate’s compliments of his brother Eddy, used to hunt rabbits in the area now known as Gepps Cross, when we shifted to Modbury, Dad told of the times when he and his mates used to ride their push bikes up to Tea Tree Gully to go shooting rabbits.
    Owing to Family circumstances, Dad was subsequently bought up by Uncle Will and Aunty Dorrie, then Uncle Bob and Aunty Myrtle.
    Dad started work as an apprentice with Perry Engineering at Mile End, and worked there in various roles from leading hand to foreman to Night Manager at the Croydon Park plant until he was made redundant after about 45 years.
    In the meantime he met Mum and I believe that on their first date he took her to watch the fights at either Thebarton or Grenfell Street. They were married in 1945, a union that lasted 67 years, they lived with Nana Min and Pop for several years before moving to Cross Street Enfield, Dad had one leg that did not bend properly as a result of a motorbike accident and he rode his push bike to work at Mile End, he overcame the leg problem by having a fixed wheel bike, and removed one of the pedals so he could get to and from work.
    We moved to Hindmarsh for about 12 months before finally moving to Camroc Avenue Tranmere till they decided to live on the Gold Coast.
    One can only wonder at the things Dad had seen during his life time, from early flight to space travel, from party lines to mobile phones and television and Computers and everything in between, and right to the end he wanted to know just how things worked, he had an enquiring mind that was always active.
    One thing I can remember was Dad had this dark blue great coat that like a lot of his clothes he wore for years, I had asked him once about it and he said that during the war he was often asked why he wasn’t in the services, and because he was in a reserved occupation was not permitted to enlist, so the overcoat solved a lot of embarrassment.
    Dad enjoyed his sport, played cricket, soccer and played electric light cricket for Perry’s, one of his great loves was the North Adelaide football club and even in Queensland was always interested in the results, and would always mention the fact that he saw Ken Farmer the great full forward. He was also prominent in the Boiler Maker’s Union as Secretary.
    When he finished work, he and Mum decided to travel around the country, first in the Sigma with the camper on top, then graduated to his much loved Cub Camper trailer, after every trip there were conversions to be made to improve their comfort.
    Dad’s other love was his fishing, everywhere they went the fishing rods went as well, and the real classic was the Pike head that bit him and was kept in the freezer until he came back to Adelaide and finally disposed of.
    Dad developed a passion for wood turning, and taught himself the art, and I am sure that all the family was kept supplied with egg cups, bag holders, toy cars, tops, and rings on rods, urns of various shapes and sizes, and various other wooden nick knacks. Working with wood became a great hobby for Dad and who hasn’t received Cockies or Ducks for the back yard. That little lathe and shed turned out wooden objects for years and it’s a wonder it lasted as long as it did, but with the love and care it got it outlasted Dad.
    Crosswords, Dad discovered crosswords, especially Lovatts, and he would enter the contests each month and eagerly await the next. I’m sure that I was not the only one to receive a call “Son do you know the answer or can you look it up on the computer”’, he won a few prizes and was always pleasantly surprised when a parcel turned up from them.
    Dad would have loved to be able to master a computer but with calls about the TV remote not working and I need a hand, it would have been a disaster especially at long range.
    His other love was his camera, he wore out a couple and as most would know he was lost if he forgot to take it with him, and he would proudly show off those he took and no one or anywhere was safe.
    Gardening was another pastime he enjoyed, no weed was safe when he was around and being on the Gold Coast where there was rain and sunshine aplenty everything flourished, his pineapples across the road, Paw Paw, Mangos, veggie garden flower garden etc. And when he ran out of things around the home would then wander off and help the old people.
    After Mum passed away, Dad finally decided that he should come back to Adelaide where his family was, he was much loved at Rotary Village where he would be seen with his walker racing around, he wore one out, so we got to enjoy the last couple of years of Dad’s long and happy life.
    It appears so I’ve been told that Dad used to watch Rage every Sunday morning and when he could not sleep would also listen to music, a surprise to some, a 95 plus listening to pop.
    Reading was no problem either, as he loved his westerns, especially Zane Gray and I think that he had read every one of them, in later life he discovered Dick Francis, Lee Child, Michael Connelly and even Mills and Boon, although I think the latter was only because of the large print.
    Greg Comments
    One of Dad's many talents was his welding, which he learnt through his trade as a boilermaker and his useful handyman exploits in doing many things around the house we lived in. I recall the time when Dad brought a rumpus room from Max Taylor's parents that we all helped to dismantle and reassemble at Camroc Ave this served as an extra bedroom as we boys grew up, the construction of the wrought iron for the front veranda fencing, erecting the back full length veranda, welding all the supports together, the making of the slips catching cradles for the Payneham and Hectorville cricket clubs, and the numerous welding jobs he did around the neighbourhood.
    Backyard cricket matches were legendary also, we were always amazed that if we ever got him out first ball it was a 'trial-er' and "you can’t get out on a trial-er'", another of his back yard rules, that was always our best chance of getting him out early, and was always willing to have a kick of the footy in the street with all the neighbouring kids.
    Dad showed a lot of respect with his children by not swearing in front of them. The worst I ever heard him say was when a hammer fell from the top step of the ladder he was using, was, "Bastard of a thing", how’s that for restraint.

    Paul’s Comments
    A lot of what has been said is etched in my memory also, other memories are that Dad taught me how to use tools, ‘a screw driver was not a chisel’ he would say and particularly how to weld, I recall putting welding rods in the oven in winter to warm them ready for use, and when helping him, “hold it still, the sparks won’t hurt you”
    I also remember the Red Dust Storm that came when Dad was painting the house with a Pale Green paint. When the storm passed we had to go out and scrape it all off again because the dust had dried into the paint.
    There also was the famous concrete strip in the back yard at Camroc Ave as mentioned by Greg, we couldn’t get Dad out no matter how hard we tried…………
    Then the time that we had squeaky floor boards in the kitchen and Dad sent me under the house with boards and a jack to put under the joists. I wouldn’t be surprised if when the house was sold off the movers wondered why there was a jack under the house.
    Amongst other things, I don’t recall Dad swearing, I believe this was his way of teaching respect.
    So, thanks Dad for what you taught me/us, you were always there to give us practical advice when needed.

    Dan’s comments.
    Where do you start to narrow down one or two stories from over 50 years of memories? I guess I will start with the most obvious to my family – which was Pa’s garden. It didn’t matter what time of year it was, there was always something to pick, nibble or admire – and Dad wasn’t shy in telling you exactly how his garden was going, what was growing, what was coming out and what was going in next.
    It didn’t matter if it was one of his pineapples growing in a pot, secretly hidden in other people’s gardens, or his strawberries and his constant battle with magpies and crows that most likely ended with a victory for the birds, but let’s call it a draw for Dad’s sake. His vendetta against snails – unless they were pets which he left alone – or cabbage moths that were dispatched with a badminton racquet and a flick of the wrist – there was always something growing plump, large and delicious. He once said to me the thing that did the most damage to his beans crop were not moths, magpies or snails, but the little ones (and not so little ones I have to admit) that would call in, say a quick hello and then head to the bean patch to snap off a handful of crisp, green, delicious beans.
    Not so much a story, but more an observation. When I was growing up, I cannot recall one time where Mum or Dad outwardly showed affection for each other. They must have been affectionate at some point (six kids being the testimony to that) but perhaps it was the time when it wasn’t the done thing to be overtly loving, or perhaps I just never noticed as I concentrated on me, myself and I as young teenagers tend to do, but I don’t remember a kiss, a hug or anything even resembling what would be considered romance. However, as time went on, especially in Mums later years and into when she couldn’t be looked after at home, it was obvious to even the casual observer how much love Dad had for her. He would hold her hand, stroke her hair, put his arm around her and wouldn’t leave her without a kiss, a hug and would always say I Love You to her, even when she couldn’t respond. To me, that will be my fondest memory of Dad that he grew to be comfortable with showing his love to his wife, regardless of who was around or the circumstances they were in.


    Having said that, I have no doubt that Mum will meet Dad at the Pearly Gates, telling him to “Hurry Up Harold, stop your bloody dawdling, I’ve been waiting here for ages” and he’ll give her a kiss, hold her hand and say “Sorry Bet, I got here as fast as I could”.
    On behalf of the family we would like to express our sincere thanks for the care and attention Dad received in his final weeks from all the staff at Estia Hope Valley, he could not have wished for better attention as the nurses and carers would all pop their head in to ensure he was Ok, and have expressed their sorrow at his passing.
    Also to acknowledge the numerous phone calls that we have received from friends expressing regret at not being able to be here today.
    Dad left 6 children, 16 Grand Children and 22 Great Grandchildren who loved him very much, and will be greatly missed.

Edward John Dwiar

M, #6628, b. 3 April 1920, d. 1953

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: 3 April 1920; AustraliaG
  • Death: 1953; Centennial Park, Sydney, New South Wales, AustraliaG

Esther Doreen Dwiar

DWIAR_Esther_Ronald
F, #6629, b. 11 January 1925, d. 2 April 2011

Parents

Family: Ronald George Bevear (b. 5 September 1919, d. 14 May 1982)

Biography

  • Name:
  • Birth: 11 January 1925; (Australia)G
  • Marriage: Before 1941; Ronald George Bevear; (Australia)G
  • Marriage: 1988; Private
  • Death: 2 April 2011; (Australia)G

Ronald George Bevear

DWIAR_Esther_Ronald
M, #6630, b. 5 September 1919, d. 14 May 1982

Family: Esther Doreen Dwiar (b. 11 January 1925, d. 2 April 2011)

Biography

  • Birth: 5 September 1919; (Australia)G; to Herbert and Mary Susan Bates
  • Marriage: Before 1941; Esther Doreen Dwiar; (Australia)G
  • Death: 14 May 1982; AustraliaG
  • Burial: After 14 May 1982; Tewantin Cemetery, Noosa, Queensland, AustraliaG

Private

F, #6631, b. 1941

Parents

Family: Peter Anthony Bugden (b. 19 December 1938, d. 6 March 2000)

Biography

Private

M, #6632, b. 1925

Biography

Peter Anthony Bugden

M, #6633, b. 19 December 1938, d. 6 March 2000

Family: Private (b. 1941)

Biography

  • Birth: 19 December 1938; Southport, Queensland, AustraliaG
  • Marriage: 1956; Private
  • Death: 6 March 2000; Murwillumbah, New South Wales, AustraliaG
  • Burial: After 6 March 2000; Murwullimbah Lawn Cemetery, Murwillumbah, New South Wales, AustraliaG

Wayne Anthony Bugden

M, #6634, b. 13 October 1959, d. 13 October 1959

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: 13 October 1959; Murwillumbah, New South Wales, AustraliaG
  • Death: 13 October 1959; Murwillumbah, New South Wales, AustraliaG

Private

M, #6635, b. 1960

Parents

Family: Private (b. 1961)

Biography

  • Birth: 1960
  • Marriage: 1981; Private

Private

F, #6636, b. 1962

Parents

Family: Private (b. 1957)

Biography

  • Birth: 1962
  • Marriage: 1981; Private

Private

F, #6637, b. 1967

Parents

Family: Private (b. 1960)

Biography

  • Birth: 1967
  • Marriage: 1990; Private

Private

F, #6638, b. 1961

Family: Private (b. 1960)

Biography

  • Birth: 1961
  • Marriage: 1981; Private

Private

M, #6639, b. 1985

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: 1985

Private

M, #6640, b. 1987

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: 1987

Private

M, #6642, b. 2005

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: 2005

Private

M, #6643, b. 1957

Family: Private (b. 1962)

Biography

  • Birth: 1957
  • Marriage: 1981; Private

Private

M, #6644, b. 1988

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: 1988

Private

M, #6645, b. 1992

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: 1992

Private

M, #6646, b. 1960

Family: Private (b. 1967)

Biography

  • Birth: 1960
  • Marriage: 1990; Private

Private

F, #6647, b. 1999

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: 1999

Private

F, #6648, b. 1999

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: 1999

Bridget Mary McInerney

F, #6649, b. 1870, d. 30 August 1964

Family: Edward John Matthew Dwiar (b. 1859, d. 22 February 1931)

Biography

  • Name:
  • Birth: 1870; (Australia)G
  • Marriage: 5 June 1889; Edward John Matthew Dwiar; Sacred Heart Church, Broken Hill, New South Wales, AustraliaG
  • Electoral Roll: 1903; Kaolin Street, Broken Hill, New South Wales, AustraliaG; performing domestic duties
  • Death: 30 August 1964; (Australia)G

Edward John Matthew Dwiar

M, #6650, b. 1859, d. 22 February 1931

Family: Bridget Mary McInerney (b. 1870, d. 30 August 1964)

Biography

  • Birth: 1859; (Australia)G
  • Marriage: 5 June 1889; Bridget Mary McInerney; Sacred Heart Church, Broken Hill, New South Wales, AustraliaG
  • Death: 22 February 1931; (Australia)G